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Why Carbon 360?

  • Develops and retains your inhouse GHG Management capacity

  • On demand certified training and support of your team

  • Saves money, time and meets stakeholder expectations

  • Compliance with global GHG standards and agnostic to commercial certifications

Equips your organisation with best practice GHG Inventory Management.

Carbon 360® supports and teaches your team to build and retain in-house capacity to confidently self-perform and meet stakeholder expectations without outsourcing or third party commercial certifications.

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90% of the world economy has net-zero commitments, as well as nearly half of the major companies and financial institutions.

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Expected consultancy cost of a midsized firm’s outsourced Greenhouse Gas Management /year.

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Of customers prefer to deal with businesses with a credible climate commitment.

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Of all commercial and public tenders demand and/or assign weight, to a verifiable decarbonisation commitment

Act or miss out

Two thirds of commercial tenders now include weighting around verifiable climate action.

Implementing a climate commitment to a globally accepted standard gives your businesses credibility and a significant competitive advantage.

Gain competitive advantage

Science based climate response at your fingertips

Why Carbon 360® is Business Smart

Meet global standards and expectations

Mandatory GHG Reporting in 40+ countries

Carbon 360® benefits

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Carbon 360® key features

Carbon 360® is a comprehensive platform that helps organisations understand and manage their GHG emissions and take action to reduce them.

1

Training and Support

Training and Support

Carbon 360® builds and retain in-house GHG management and reporting capacity through on demand videos and supporting training materials and tools.

2

GHG Inventory Management

Inventory Management

Carbon 360® provides a range of tools for tracking and managing GHG emissions, including creating and updating organisation's GHG inventories.

3

Scientific Data capture

Scientific Data Capture

Carbon 360® allows organisations to integrate data from various sources, such as energy consumption, transportation, and waste management, to create a  complete & science based GHG inventory.

4

Compliant GHG Reporting

Compliant Reporting

Carbon 360® supports a range of GHG reporting standards, including the GHG Protocol. It provides tools for documenting and disclosing GHG emissions to internal and external stakeholders

5

GHG Reduction Tracking

GHG Reduction Tracking

Carbon 360® provides tools for identifying GHG reduction opportunities and tracking progress towards GHG decarbonisation and reduction goals.

6

Cost Savings

Cost Savings

Implementing GHG reduction strategies can also lead to cost savings, such as reduced energy consumption and waste management costs. Carbon 360® can help organisations identify these opportunities.

Frequently asked questions

Below are some common questions answered.
Have a question? Email us here.

The short answer is to help organisations develop and retain capacity for self-powered and globally recognised Greenhouse Gas inventory Management.

Carbon 360® trains, supports and empowers any business to implement decarbonisation in accordance with the GHG Protocol and ISO 14064 standards. The Carbon 360® platform is an open source solution which encourages  and empowers businesses to act, and do so on their own terms.

Climate action is not just directed towards statutory compliance or earning social license. Worldwide pressure is mounting on businesses to reduce their value chain emissions. Businesses are increasingly implementing pre-qualification requirements which requires their value chain partners to maintain credible climate action, decarbonise their operations and to report the emissions associated with the goods, products, services, etc they supply to businesses. 

Carbon 360® is a truly unique end-to-end, on demand and certification agnostic GHG Management and training platform true to the GHG Protocol and ISO 14064+, the global standards for mandatory GHG reporting in 40+ countries.

The GHG Protocol (Greenhouse Gas Protocol) is a standardised framework for quantifying, managing, and reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It was developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) in 1998 as a voluntary tool for companies and governments to measure and report their GHG emissions.

The GHG Protocol consists of two main types of standards: the Corporate Standard and the Product Standard. The Corporate Standard is used to quantify and report a company’s GHG emissions, while the Product Standard is used to quantify and report the GHG emissions associated with the production, use, and disposal of a product.

The Corporate Standard is divided into three scopes: scope 1, scope 2, and scope 3. Scope 1 emissions are direct emissions from sources owned or controlled by the company, such as fossil fuel combustion in company-owned vehicles or boilers. Scope 2 emissions are indirect emissions from the generation of purchased electricity, steam, or heat that is used by the company. Scope 3 emissions are all other indirect emissions that are not included in scope 1 or scope 2, such as the GHG emissions associated with the transportation of goods or the disposal of waste.

The Product Standard is used to calculate the GHG emissions associated with a product’s entire life cycle, from raw material extraction to disposal. It is divided into three phases: material production, product manufacturing, and use. The Product Standard provides a consistent method for companies to compare the GHG emissions of different products and identify opportunities for reduction.

The GHG Protocol is widely recognised as the international standard for GHG accounting and reporting, and it is used by thousands of companies and governments around the world. It is supported by numerous organisations, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO).

One of the main benefits of the GHG Protocol is that it provides a transparent and consistent method for companies and governments to report their GHG emissions, which can help build trust and credibility with stakeholders. It also helps organisations identify and prioritise opportunities for GHG reduction, which can contribute to the transition to a low-carbon economy.

In addition to the GHG Protocol standards, the WRI and WBCSD also offer a range of tools and resources to help organisations implement the GHG Protocol, such as training programs and calculation tools.

Overall, the GHG Protocol is a valuable tool for measuring and reducing GHG emissions, and it plays a critical role in the global effort to combat climate change. It helps companies and governments understand and manage their GHG emissions and take action to reduce them, which is essential for building a more sustainable and low-carbon future.

Carbon Accounting is the process of measuring, quantifying, and reporting an organisation’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It involves calculating the amount of GHGs that are emitted by an organisation’s operations, such as energy use, transportation, and waste management, as well as the GHGs that are emitted as a result of the organisation’s products and services.

Carbon accounting is an important tool for organisations to understand and manage their GHG emissions, as it helps identify sources of emissions and opportunities for reduction. It also allows organisations to track their progress towards GHG reduction goals and report their emissions to stakeholders.

There are various approaches and methods for carbon accounting, including the GHG Protocol, which is a standardised framework for GHG accounting and reporting developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). The GHG Protocol consists of two main standards: the Corporate Standard and the Product Standard. The Corporate Standard is used to quantify and report a company’s GHG emissions, while the Product Standard is used to quantify and report the GHG emissions associated with the production, use, and disposal of a product.

In addition to the GHG Protocol, there are other methods and tools for carbon accounting, such as the Carbon Trust Standard and the ISO 14064 series of standards. These approaches provide guidance on how to measure, report, and verify GHG emissions in a consistent and transparent manner.

Carbon accounting is often used in conjunction with carbon offsetting, which is the process of reducing GHG emissions in one place to compensate for GHG emissions that are generated elsewhere. Carbon offsetting allows organisations to mitigate the GHG emissions that they are unable to reduce directly by funding GHG reduction projects, such as renewable energy or reforestation projects.

Carbon accounting and offsetting are important tools for addressing climate change and transitioning to a low-carbon economy. By understanding and managing their GHG emissions, organisations can take action to reduce their impact on the environment and contribute to the global effort to combat climate change.

GHG management is the process of identifying, measuring, and reducing an organisation’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It involves understanding the sources of GHG emissions within an organisation, setting GHG reduction goals, and implementing strategies and actions to achieve those goals.

GHG management is an important tool for addressing climate change and transitioning to a low-carbon economy. GHGs, such as carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and contribute to global warming. Reducing GHG emissions can help mitigate the negative impacts of climate change, such as sea level rise, extreme weather events, and biodiversity loss.

There are various approaches and tools available for GHG management, including the GHG Protocol, which is a standardised framework for GHG accounting and reporting developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). The GHG Protocol consists of two main standards: the Corporate Standard and the Product Standard. The Corporate Standard is used to quantify and report a company’s GHG emissions, while the Product Standard is used to quantify and report the GHG emissions associated with the production, use, and disposal of a product.

In addition to the GHG Protocol, there are other methods and tools for GHG management, such as the Carbon Trust Standard and the ISO 14064 series of standards. These approaches provide guidance on how to measure, report, and verify GHG emissions in a consistent and transparent manner.

Effective GHG management requires the involvement of all levels of an organisation, from top management to individual employees. It also requires the support of key stakeholders, such as customers, investors, and regulators.

There are numerous benefits to GHG management, including cost savings, improved brand reputation, and compliance with regulatory requirements. By implementing GHG management strategies, organisations can reduce their environmental impact and contribute to the global effort to combat climate change.

Greenhouse gases (GHGs) are gases that are emitted into the atmosphere and trap heat, contributing to the greenhouse effect and global warming. The main GHGs are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O), which are emitted through human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels, agriculture, and waste management, as well as natural sources such as the decomposition of organic matter.

Carbon dioxide is the most prevalent GHG and is emitted through the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas, as well as through land use and land-use change, such as deforestation and urbanization. It is also produced by the decomposition of organic matter and is emitted by animals during respiration.

Methane is a potent GHG that is emitted through the decomposition of organic matter in landfills, agricultural activities, such as livestock farming and rice cultivation, and the extraction and transportation of fossil fuels. It is also emitted by wetlands and rice paddies.

Nitrous oxide is a GHG that is emitted through the use of nitrogen-based fertilizers in agriculture, the burning of fossil fuels, and the decomposition of organic matter in landfills and wetlands. It is also emitted by the use of nitric acid and the production of adipic acid, which is used to make nylon and other synthetic fibres.

GHGs trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere, contributing to the greenhouse effect, which is the natural process by which the Earth’s atmosphere warms the planet. Without the greenhouse effect, the Earth’s surface would be too cold to support life. However, the concentration of GHGs in the atmosphere has increased significantly over the past century due to human activities, leading to an increase in global temperatures and the potential for negative impacts on the environment and human health.

Reducing GHG emissions is an important part of addressing climate change and transitioning to a low-carbon economy. There are various strategies for reducing GHG emissions, including increasing energy efficiency, transitioning to renewable energy sources, and implementing carbon pricing and cap-and-trade systems. By reducing GHG emissions, we can mitigate the negative impacts of climate change and build a more sustainable and liveable planet for future generations.

Carbon offsetting is the process of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in one place to compensate for GHG emissions that are generated elsewhere. It allows individuals and organisations to mitigate the GHG emissions that they are unable to reduce directly by funding GHG reduction projects, such as renewable energy or reforestation projects.

Carbon offsetting is often used as a tool for climate change mitigation and as a way for individuals and organisations to reduce their carbon footprint. It can be used to offset GHG emissions from activities such as air travel, driving, and energy use in buildings.

There are various types of carbon offset projects, including renewable energy projects, such as wind or solar power, and carbon sequestration projects, such as reforestation or soil carbon sequestration. Carbon offset projects are designed to reduce or remove GHGs from the atmosphere, either by replacing fossil fuels with clean energy sources or by storing carbon in vegetation or soils.

To be effective, carbon offset projects must be verifiable, permanent, and additional. Verifiable means that the GHG emissions reductions achieved by the project can be accurately measured and verified. Permanent means that the GHG emissions reductions achieved by the project will last for a long period of time. Additional means that the GHG emissions reductions achieved by the project would not have occurred without the funding provided by the carbon offset.

Carbon offsetting is often used in conjunction with carbon accounting, which is the process of measuring, quantifying, and reporting an organisation’s GHG emissions. Carbon accounting helps organisations understand their GHG emissions and identify opportunities for reduction, while carbon offsetting allows them to offset any remaining emissions that cannot be reduced directly.

There are various organisations and programs that offer carbon offsetting services, including carbon offset providers, brokers, and exchanges. These organisations help individuals and organisations purchase carbon offsets and support GHG reduction projects.

Overall, carbon offsetting is a tool that allows individuals and organisations to reduce their GHG emissions and contribute to the global effort to combat climate change. By offsetting their GHG emissions, they can mitigate their impact on the environment and support the transition to a low-carbon economy.

Greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting refers to the process of measuring, documenting, and disclosing GHG emissions from a particular source or organisation. GHG emissions are gases that trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere, contributing to climate change. The main GHGs are carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, but there are many others. GHG reporting is an important tool for understanding and reducing GHG emissions, as it helps organisations and governments identify sources of emissions, track progress towards reducing emissions, and set reduction targets.

GHG reporting can be mandatory or voluntary. In many countries, GHG reporting is mandatory for large industrial facilities and power plants, as well as for certain sectors such as transportation and agriculture. These regulations may require organisations to report their GHG emissions on an annual basis, using standardised reporting protocols and procedures. GHG reporting may also be voluntary, meaning that organisations choose to report their emissions even if they are not required to do so by law. Voluntary GHG reporting can be a useful way for organisations to demonstrate their commitment to sustainability and to engage with stakeholders on climate-related issues.

There are several key elements to GHG reporting. First, organisations need to identify and measure their GHG emissions. This can involve collecting data on energy use, fuel consumption, and other activities that generate GHGs. Organisations may also need to use specialised software and tools to calculate their GHG emissions, based on factors such as the type and quantity of fuel used, the efficiency of equipment, and the GHG intensity of different activities.

Second, organisations need to report their GHG emissions using a standardised reporting framework, such as the GHG Protocol or the ISO 14064 standard. These frameworks provide guidelines and definitions for measuring and reporting GHG emissions, as well as for estimating and accounting for uncertainty in GHG measurements.

Third, organisations may need to verify or audit their GHG emissions data to ensure its accuracy and reliability. This can involve having an independent third party review and confirm the data, or it can involve using a recognised GHG verification or certification standard, such as the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) or the Carbon Trust Standard.

Finally, organisations may need to disclose or communicate their GHG emissions data to stakeholders, such as investors, customers, or the general public. This can involve publishing a GHG emissions report or making the data available online through a GHG reporting platform or registry. GHG reporting can also be used to set and track progress towards GHG reduction targets, such as those outlined in a company’s sustainability plan or a government’s climate action plan.

GHG reporting can have a number of benefits for organisations. It can help organisations understand and reduce their GHG emissions, which can in turn reduce their operating costs and improve their environmental performance. GHG reporting can also help organisations communicate their efforts to address climate change and engage with stakeholders on this issue. Finally, GHG reporting can help organisations build credibility and trust by providing transparent and accurate information about their GHG emissions.

What are the benefits with GHG Reporting?

Greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting is the process of quantifying, documenting, and disclosing an organisation’s GHG emissions. GHG reporting provides a number of benefits, including:

  1. Improved understanding of GHG emissions: GHG reporting helps organisations understand the sources of their GHG emissions and the impact of their operations on the environment. This understanding can help organisations identify and prioritize opportunities for GHG reduction.

  2. Stakeholder engagement: GHG reporting helps organisations engage with stakeholders, such as investors, customers, and regulators, by providing transparent and consistent information about their GHG emissions. This can build trust and credibility with stakeholders and enhance the organisation’s reputation.

  3. Compliance with regulatory requirements: Many jurisdictions have GHG reporting requirements, and GHG reporting can help organisations comply with these requirements and avoid potential fines or penalties.

  4. Improved decision-making: GHG reporting can provide valuable information for decision-making, such as identifying cost-effective GHG reduction opportunities or identifying areas where the organisation may be exposed to regulatory or reputational risks.

  5. Support for GHG reduction goals: GHG reporting can help organisations set and track progress towards GHG reduction goals, and it can provide a baseline for measuring the effectiveness of GHG reduction strategies.

  6. Cost savings: Implementing GHG reduction strategies can lead to cost savings, such as reduced energy consumption and waste management costs. GHG reporting can help organisations identify these opportunities and track the resulting cost savings.

Overall, GHG reporting is a valuable tool for organisations to understand and manage their GHG emissions and take action to reduce them. It helps organisations engage with stakeholders, comply with regulatory requirements, and support GHG reduction goals, which can contribute to the transition to a low-carbon economy.